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EPA Extends Clean Water Rule Comment Period


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Comment Period For Repeal of Clean Water Rule Extended to Sept. 27

August 30, 2017 – Responding to complaints that there was inadequate time available to comment on the repeal of the WOTUS or Clean Water Rule, EPA and the US Army Corps of Engineers have extended the rule making comment period by 30 days.

The new deadline to submit comments is September 27, 2017. The most effective way to voice your opinion on changing the Clean Water Rule is to click on this link for the federal website for comment or type https://www.regulations.gov/comment?D=EPA-HQ-OW-2017-0203-0001 into your web brower.

“This attempt to repeal the Clean Water Rule needed more than a 30-day comment period,” said Tennessee Clean Water Network Executive Director Renee Hoyos. “The Clean Water Rule was developed and issued in 2015 after years of research, public hearings and comments by hundreds of thousands of citizens concerned about the environment. More than 80 percent of the comments received regarding the 2015 Clean Water Rule were supportive of its implementation.”

“EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt is trying to ram through this rule change that will eliminate an important rule protecting clean water in the United States. I hope everyone will take this opportunity to tell EPA and the Corps not to repeal the Clean Water Rule,” Hoyos added.

The 2015 Clean Water Rule is designed to protect America’s drinking water from pollution.

Millions of people get their drinking water from lakes, rivers and aquifers - water resources that are clearly covered by the Clean Water Act.

However, about one out of every three people get their drinking water from a water source that is temporary or flows intermittently. The scientific studies conducted by EPA clearly show a connection between small and/or temporary streams and larger bodies of water like lakes and rivers.

Quoting from an EPA study abstract, “The scientific literature unequivocally demonstrates that streams, regardless of their size or frequency of flow, are connected to downstream waters and strongly influence their function.”

“It is important to protect these sources of water, as the more polluted they are, the more it costs to remove contaminants and other nasty things at the water treatment plants,” Hoyos said. “Constructing new or expanding existing facilities is an expensive proposition, so it is better for the taxpayer to control any polluting activities at the source.”

“I urge all Tennesseans to take advantage of this comment period extension to stand up for clean water in the state,” Hoyos added.

#EPA #comment #WOTUS #CleanWaterRule

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