April 18, 2003

1) TCWN WORKING FOR YOU! Raising Critical Water Quality Issues to the New Commissioner
2) ACTION ALERT: Land Acquisition Funds in Jeopardy!
3) ACTION ALERT: Land Conservation Fund Rally
4) PUBLIC PARTICIPATION OPPORTUNITY: Hearings to Discuss Well Construction Rules
5) NEWS: Water Demands Draining U.S. Rivers
6) NEWS: World Water Forum 2003 Highlights
7) EVENT: Obed-Emory Riverfest - May 3, 2003
8) EVENT: French Broad River Festival - May 9-11, 2003
9) EVENT: 2003 National Source Water Protection Conference
10) EVENT: "Water for a Sustainable and Secure Future" Conference
11) RESOURCE: Cottonwood Foundation Offers Grants for Grassroots Organizations
12) RESOURCE: Updated Catalog of Federal Funding for Watershed Protection Now Online
13) RESOURCE: Outreach Kit Helps Local Communities Inform Public About Stormwater Issues
14) PUBLIC NOTICE: NPDES Permits
15) PUBLIC NOTICE: TDEC Mining Section NPDES Permits
16) PUBLIC NOTICE: Aquatic Resource Alteration Permit (ARAP) Notices
17) PUBLIC NOTICE: US Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District Permit Notices

1) TCWN WORKING FOR YOU! Raising Critical Water Quality Issues to the New Commissioner
Tennessee Clean Water Network working with the Tennessee Environmental Council, Tennessee Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility, Tennessee Nature Conservancy, Tennessee
Scenic Rivers Association, League of Women Voters, and Tennessee Conservation Voters met with Commissioner Betsy Child on April 17 about key water quality issues in the state.

The briefing provided Commissioner Child with an overview of key water quality issues in the state including biodiversity, public participation and outreach, permit appeals,
enforcement of water pollution permits, state financial resources, and the Water Quality Control Board. These organizations are working hard to highlight key issues of concern to the tens of
thousands of citizens who are members for these organizations.

Tennessee Clean Water Network played a key role in putting together this presentation and will use this opportunity to put water quality on the Commissioner's radar as one of the most
important environmental issues in the State of Tennessee.

2) ACTION ALERT: Land Acquisition Funds in Jeopardy!
Since 1986, the proceeds from a dedicated Wetlands and State Parks Land Acquisitions Fund have made it possible to bring many millions of matching dollars to Tennessee and put them to use in conserving critical natural areas. The creation of the funding source through a real estate
transfer tax was a hard fought battle at the time but has proved to be a far sighted and valuable decision for the state of Tennessee. Since its inception the fund has empowered acquisition of nearly 190,000 acres of wetlands and state park areas. This land acquisition fund has successfully leveraged state funds to gain matching money from federal, local, and private money sources at an average 4:1 ratio every year. As a result, many thousands of acres of wetlands and state park lands have been protected that would otherwise have been lost forever.

Governor Bredesen's proposed budget converts existing reserves derived from this dedicated funding stream, the real estate transfer tax, to the general fund. His budget also transfers many other fund reserves to the general fund in an effort to balance the budget (as required by the state Constitution). Many of those funds are not 100 percent converted to the general fund. The wetlands/state land acquisition/local parks/agricultural resources funds are 100 percent converted. Even more importantly, those other transfers do not abolish the dedicated funding streams which created the funds. For instance, 9 percent of the gas tax fund is transferred to the general fund. But the state law sending gas taxes to transportation for road building is not abolished or stripped of its dedicated purpose. If the Governor or the legislature wish to transfer parts or all of the reserves in this fund in the future, then further action must be taken. Not so with wetlands, state land, local park land and agricultural resources. His budget does keep the real estate transfer tax but abolishes the dedication part. So if SB1991/HB2073 passes as currently written we will have moved backwards in a big-time way.

The primary decisions on the budget will be made by the Tennessee House and Senate Finance Committees. You are urged to make your opinions known by contacting your senators and representatives and letting them know you oppose eliminating the wetland/land conservation accounts. A nine percent cut is fair, but the account should not be eliminated. Below are some specific targets.

Governor Phil Bredesen
State Capitol
Nashville TN 37243
615-741-2001

SENATE FINANCE COMMITTEE MEMBERS
Senator Henry (Nashville)
Senators Crutchfield (Chattanooga)
Senator Fowler (Chattanooga)
Senator Atchley (Knoxville)
Senator Burchett (Knoxville)
Senator Ford (Memphis)
Senator Kyle (Memphis)

HOUSE FINANCE COMMITTEE MEMBERS
Representative Tindell, (Knoxville)
Representative Armstrong (Knoxville)
Representative Overby (Knoxville)
Representative Rep. Tommie Brown (Chattanooga)
Representative Chumney (Memphis)
Representative Kent (Memphis)
Representative Miller (Memphis)
Representative Sargent (Franklin/Nashville)

Suggested message to legislators about this devastating budget proposal:
· Treat these funds fairly! State legislators, you are not looking at a proposed budget which cuts spending 100% in many areas other than the important wetlands/ state parks/local parks/agricultural conservation. Reduce the fund if you have to, but do it fairly.
· Treat these funds fairly! State legislators, you are not looking at a proposed budget which eliminates dedicated funding for the future for other funds. Even for funds where the budget proposes taking the reserves now, the dedicated funding source is left intact for other funds.
· Treat our land fairly now! Transfer 9% of our funds to general purposes if you have to, but don't touch our dedicated funding mechanism!

To get the e-mail address of any of Tennessee's state legislators, visit the following websites:
http://www.legislature.state.tn.us/senate/members/smembers.htm#Find http://www.legislature.state.tn.us/house/members/hmembers.htm#Find

For more information on this important issue, please visit the TEC website at www.tectn.org.

Source: Tennessee Environmental News and Tennessee Conservation Voters

3) ACTION ALERT: Land Conservation Funds Rally
Attend the "Save the Land Conservation Funds" rally!
On Tuesday, April 22 - Earth Day, gather at legislative plaza for a Capitol Hill rally and press conference, followed by lobbying legislative offices. If the weather holds, meet in the plaza adjacent the the steps of the War Memorial Building.
Tentative schedule:
Rally - 10:15
Media conf. - 10:30
Lobby day - 10:45
Materials and information will be provided.

Source: Tennessee Environmental Council

4) PUBLIC PARTICIPATION OPPORTUNITY: Hearings to Discuss Well Construction Rules
There will be hearings before the Department of Environment and Conservation to consider the promulgation of amendments of rules pursuant to Tennessee Code Annotated, Section 69-11-101 et seq. To be discussed: Proposed rule changes regarding licensing and construction standards for drillers of monitor, water and geothermal wells and installers of pumps and water treatment in water wells. The hearings will be held on the following dates:

April 22, 2003 at 1:00 pm
Conference Room A, Jackson Environmental Assistance Center, 362 Carriage Drive, Jackson TN 38305

April 24, 2003 at 10:00 am
Main Auditorium at the Fleming Environmental Training Center, 2022 Blanton Drive, Murfreesboro TN

April 29, 2003 at 1:00 pm
West Conference Room, Knoxville Environmental Assistance Center, 2700 Middlebrook Pike, Suite 220, Knoxville TN 37921

The proposed rules may be accessed at http://www.state.tn.us/environment/dws/dwsppo/

Source: http://www.state.tn.us/environment/dws/

5) NEWS: Water Demands Draining U.S. Rivers
Many of America's rivers are suffering from severe water shortages, with drought and human water consumption placing some of these waterways in acute peril, warns a new report released by American Rivers. The report, "America's Most Endangered Rivers of 2003," details 10 rivers that face immediate and severe danger, but paints a larger picture of a nation tumbling towards a possible water crisis. At the center of the concern is a simple fact - the United States uses more water per person than any other country with little regard for waste or cost. The U.S. average of 1,300 gallons per day is some 60 times the average for many developing countries, according to the World Water Council, with some 85 percent used to for irrigation.

U.S. irrigation habits, urban sprawl, increased groundwater pumping and loss of wetlands are endangering the nation's rivers and draining its fresh water supply, and more often than not government policies are making things worse. Two federal government projects, one to drain 300 square miles of wetlands and another to scour more than 100 miles of river bottom, put Mississippi's Big Sunflower River at the top of this year's list. These U.S. Army Corps of Engineer flood control projects are poised to go forward this year, unless reviews by state officials or the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) judge otherwise.

The effects of federal agricultural policy and subsidies have had a severe impact on the Klamath River, which is the second cited by American Rivers. The Bush administration's decision to increase irrigation flows to farmers in the upper region of the river contributed to the deaths of some 33,000 salmon last September. This was the worst recorded fish kill in U.S. history.

Severe water shortages earned the Ipswich River the number three slot on the list, but it is not agricultural policy that is causing the crisis in the Massachusetts river. It is excessive groundwater pumping and municipal water consumption that leave portions of the river dry each summer. The combination of excessive municipal water consumption and groundwater pumping are directly related and threaten water supplies across the nation. The United States now pumps some 28 trillion gallons of groundwater every year with little regard for how this affects the hydrological cycle. Pumping groundwater reduces the natural flow of water into the nation's rivers and depletes a resource that took thousands of years to accumulate. But as demand for water increases, local and state entities are increasingly looking below ground for additional supply.

This has created a direct threat to the Platte River, which is on the endangered list, and threatens to undermine an agreement to secure adequate flows in the Platte River and to protect its adjacent wetlands. The Platte River, which runs through Wyoming, Colorado and Nebraska, is considered by conservationists to be the most important stopover for migratory birds in the nation's heartland. Excessive diversion and consumption are also responsible for putting the Rio Grande on this year's list, and water flow issues also led the organization to put Colorado's Gunnison River on its list.

In part because of population growth, the nation's municipal water consumption is the fastest growing sector of U.S. water use, in particular from low density sprawl development. This is a serious concern for the Mattaponi River, which makes the endangered list because it is threatened by a planned reservoir that would provide water for the sprawling cities of Virginia's Tidewater region. Virginia's Mattaponi River is considered one of the most pristine coastal river systems on the eastern seaboard.

The other rivers on the list are Colorado's Gunnison River, which is burdened by unnatural water flows, along with the Snake River and Georgia's Tallapoosa River, which are both threatened by impacts from dams, and the Trinity River in Texas, which could be severely affected by planned flood control and floodplain projects.

To access a copy of the report, see www.americanrivers.org

Source: Environment News Service

6) NEWS: World Water Forum 2003 Highlights
The Third World Water Forum was held March 16-23 in the neighboring cities of Kyoto, Shiga, and Osaka, Japan. More than 24,000 participants from 182 countries attended the event, which is held every 3 years under the auspices of the World Water Council (WWC; Marseilles, France), an international nonprofit, nongovernmental "think tank" formed in 1996 to address critical
water issues worldwide.

Several environmental groups and other nongovernmental organizations expressed disappointment in the overall outcome of this year's forum, noting that certain key issues, such as declaring access to clean water as a basic human right, were not addressed in the final consensus declaration presented by government ministers from 101 countries and delegates from 69 others.

For the complete story visit:
http://www.wef.org/MemberZone/WefReporter/Archive/2003/wefreporter.0409.jhtml

Source: RiverInfo - a River Network listserve

7) EVENT: Obed-Emory Riverfest - May 3, 2003
Come join in a fun-filled day of live music, good food, regional arts and crafts, games, outdoor activities, and much more!! The 2003 Obed-Emory RiverFest is scheduled for Saturday, May 3 in downtown Wartburg, Tennessee. This year's festival will include hiking, swimming, and other events for outdoor enthusiasts, as well as a celebration of the communities of Morgan County, with local bands, local food, regional arts & crafts, and performances and informational presentations by area students.

A volunteer River Cleanup will begin at 8:00 at the main stage (next to the National Park Service Visitor Center). The event will also include one or more Chota (Doug Klaras - 865-637-7451)/ETWC (Patrick Martin - 865-376-0197) whitewater trips, ranging from Class II-IV, water levels permitting. In addition, in the afternoon, there will be an ongoing outdoor gear swap on the courthouse grounds. (No registration or fees required.)

There is NO CHARGE for attending the festival. Volunteer donations will be used to support the
teachers of Morgan County for water quality education and student field trips to the Obed and
Emory Rivers. (Note: In the event of bad weather, the festival will relocate from downtown to the Wartburg Civic Center)

Source: Emory River Watershed Association

8) EVENT: French Broad River Festival - May 9-11, 2003
Friday: Local bluegrass music, race registration, vending, camping at festival site.
Saturday: Vending and live music from noon to midnight. Afternoon race down the French Broad River, silent auction, raffle drawing. Located on the Hot Springs Spa and Campground property. For more information contact Mark Mickey or Chris Donochod at [email protected]

9) EVENT: 2003 National Source Water Protection Conference
Washington, D.C. June 2 - 4, 2003
The conference will bring together various Federal, Tribal, State, and local officials; watershed managers; conservation partners; members of environmental, public health, business, and citizens' organizations; technical assistance providers and others to learn about effective actions that prevent contamination of drinking water sources.
For additional information, visit http://www.epa.gov/ogwdw/protect/swpconf.html

Source: EPA

10) EVENT: "Water for a Sustainable and Secure Future" Conference
The National Council for Science and the Environment will hold its 4th National Conference on Science, Policy and the Environment: "Water for a Sustainable and Secure Future" on January 29-30, 2004 at the Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center in Washington, D.C.
Preliminary information is available at: http://www.ncseonline.org/NCSEconference/2004conference/

11) RESOURCE: Cottonwood Foundation Offers Grants for Grassroots Organizations
Deadline: Open
The Cottonwood Foundation, a nonprofit organization dedicated to promoting empowerment of people, protection of the environment, and respect for cultural diversity, has announced its 2003 grant request information. In 2003, the foundation will award approximately 40 grants in the $500 to $1,000 range to grassroots organizations in the United States and internationally. The foundation has a very limited amount of funding available and will only award grants to organizations that work to protect the environment, promote cultural diversity, empower people to meet their basic needs, and rely on volunteer efforts.

Examples of activities that might be funded include replanting of native plant species; land acquisition; construction of housing or buildings; purchase of tools, equipment, seeds, or animals; conducting training workshops; developing educational materials; providing funds
or micro-loans for job creation; construction or repair of community water systems; ecosystem restoration; and purchase of alternative energy equipment. The foundation also provides funding for general support, particularly for organizations with very small budgets. The foundation is particularly interested in supporting organizations for which small grants will make a signiicant difference. Applicant organizations are not required to have 501(c)(3) status, but only charitable, nonprofit organizations will receive consideration.

For complete program guidelines, application information, and answers to frequently asked questions, see the Cottonwood Foundation Web site: http://www.cottonwoodfdn.org/

For additional RFPs in Environment, visit: http://fdncenter.org/pnd/rfp/cat_environment.jhtml

12) RESOURCE: Updated Catalog of Federal Funding for Watershed Protection Now Online
EPA has recently updated the Catalog of Federal Funding Sources for Watershed Protection. This Catalog is now online as an easy to use, searchable Web site. The Web site provides information for watershed practitioners and others on 84 Federal funding sources that may be
available to help fund various watershed-related projects. The Web site updates EPA's Catalog of Federal Funding Sources for Watershed Protection (EPA 841-B-99-003) which was previously published in 1999. This Web site was developed by an Office of Water Finance Work Group with representatives from staff in the Office of Water. EPA plans to update the Web site on an ongoing basis. A one-page flyer to publicize this new Web site is available at no charge from NSCEP at 800-490-9198 (please ask for the flyer called "Catalog of Federal Funding Sources for Watershed Protection," EPA 841-F-03-001).
To view the Web site, visit http://www.epa.gov/watershedfunding.

Source: EPA

13) RESOURCE: Outreach Kit Helps Local Communities Inform Public About Stormwater Issues
A new CD-ROM kit released by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) provides local officials with customizable community outreach materials focused on new (Phase II) National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System requirements for stormwater discharges. The materials are designed to help local agencies inform homeowners, construction site operators, and businesses about the new rules. Users can customize the materials by adding the local agency's name, address, and contact information to each component. Included are publications and other information products on understanding stormwater and stormwater runoff, preventing residential stormwater pollution, managing stormwater at construction sites, water-efficient landscaping, and financing stormwater projects through the Clean Water State Revolving Fund. Materials included in the kit may be viewed on EPA's "Stormwater Month" Web site at http://cfpub.epa.gov/npdes/stormwatermonth.cfm (The agency designated April as Stormwater Month as part of its yearlong celebration of the 30th anniversary of the Clean Water Act.) The CD-ROM may be ordered by sending a request via e-mail to Nikos Singelis at [email protected]

Source: RiverInfo - a River Network listserve

14) PUBLIC NOTICE: NPDES Permits
TDEC has posted the following draft environmental permits to solicit comments and information necessary to evaluate the potential impact of the proposed activities on human health and the environment. Submit comments by mail to TDEC, Division of Water Pollution Control, 6th Floor, L&C Tower, 401 Church St., Nashville, TN 37243, Attn: Public Notice Coordinator; by fax at (615) 532-0503; or by email at [email protected] Comments must be received by MAY 12, 2003.

Individual NPDES Permits
Proposed Modifications
Applicant name AUB-Oostanaula Creek STP
Permit number TN0024201 Permit Writer Initials WDM EAC Name Chattanooga
Major discharger Yes
Location 220 Alford Street
County McMinn
City Athens
Zip 37303
Description of activity modification of the municipal wastewater treatment facilty from 2.83 to 6.0 MGD
Effluent description treated municipal wastewater from Outfall 001
Receiving stream Oostanaula Creek Mile 30.1
Facility latitude 35.425000 Facility longitude -84.590277

Proposed Reissuances
Applicant name Ameristeel - West Tennessee Steel Mill Division
Permit number TN0074811 Permit Writer Initials SEF EAC Name Jackson
Major discharger No
Location U. S. Highway 45 North (801 Ameristeel Road)
County Madison
City Jackson
Zip 38305
Description of activity Steel Works, Blast Furnaces (Including Coke Ovens), and Rolling Mills Effluent description cooling water (Outfalls 001 and 002)
Receiving stream mile 1.5 of Dyer Creek to Middle Fork Forked Deer River at mile 31.5 (001), and mile 1.0 of an unnamed tributary to Middle Fork Forked Deer River at mile 32.5 (002)
Facility latitude 35.721667 Facility longitude -88.820556

Applicant name Linden Lagoon
Permit number TN0064394 Permit Writer Initials HVA EAC Name Columbia
Major discharger No
Location Buffalo River Heights Road
County Perry
City Linden
Zip 37096
Description of activity lagoon system
Effluent description treated municipal wastewater from Outfall 001
Receiving stream Buffalo River at mile 40.0
Facility latitude 35.631388 Facility longitude -87.825555

Applicant name Rossville STP
Permit number TN0064092 Permit Writer Initials PRM EAC Name Memphis
Major discharger Yes
Location West End of of North Railroad Street, Rossville, TN 3806
County Fayette
City Rossville
Zip 38066
Description of activity Treatment of municipal sewage
Effluent description treated domestic wastewater from Outfall 001
Receiving stream Wolf River at mile 43.7
Facility latitude 35.054167 Facility longitude -89.541111

Applicant name Industrial Oil Service
Permit number TN0057738 Permit Writer Initials SEF EAC Name Knoxville
Major discharger No
Location 2708 Crosslane Road
County Knox
City Knoxville
Zip 37931
Description of activity Collect bulk used oil from different sources including filling stations, vehicle maintenance shops and industries for recycling.
Effluent description storm water runoff from Outfall 001
Receiving stream Meadow Creek at mile 0.4 to Beaver Creek at mile 12.8
Facility latitude 35.961111 Facility longitude -84.130556

Applicant name Paris Landing State Park Public Pool
Permit number TN0062430 Permit Writer Initials PRM EAC Name Jackson
Major discharger No
Location 16055 Hwy 79N
County Henry
City Buchanan
Zip 38222
Description of activity pool filter backwash through Outfalls 001 and 002
Effluent description treated process wastewater from Outfalls 001and 002
Receiving stream separate embayments of Kentucky Lake on the Tennessee River at mile 66.0
Facility latitude 36.202778 Facility longitude -88.078611

Applicant name TVA-Melton Hill Hydro Plant
Permit number TN0027464 Permit Writer Initials PRM EAC Name Knoxville
Major discharger No
Location TN Hwy 95
County Loudon
City Oak Ridge
Zip 37830
Description of activity Electric Services
Effluent description cooling water from Outfall 001
Receiving stream Clinch River Mi. 23.1
Facility latitude Facility longitude
Source: http://www.state.tn.us/environment/wpc/wpcppo/mdi/

15) PUBLIC NOTICE: TDEC Mining Section NPDES Permits
TDEC Mining Section has posted the following proposals to issue, reissue, deny or terminate National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits as listed below. These permits authorize and regulate discharges of treated wastewater and/or storm water from mining and processing facilities, including access roads and haul roads located within the affected areas. Send comments to TDEC Mining Section, Attn: Public Notice Coordinator, 2700 Middlebrook Pike, Suite 220, Knoxville, TN 37921 by MAY 19, 2003

Non-Coal Proposed Issuance
Almar Rock, Inc., 139 United Drive, Jackson, TN 38305-8812. Birdsong Mine, NPDES Permit TN0076392. This proposed construction sand and gravel mining facility, located at latitude 35_52_00_, longitude 87_57_30_, will discharge treated wastewater and storm water to an unnamed tributary of the Kentucky Reservoir (Tennessee River) in Benton County.

Non-Coal Proposed Reissuances
Rogers Group, Inc., P. O. Box 25250, Nashville, TN 37202. Cowan Quarry, NPDES Permit TN0066311. This existing limestone quarry and processing facility, with an asphalt plant, located at latitude 35_09_20_, longitude 86_00_35_, discharges treated wastewater and storm water into an unnamed tributary to Boiling Fork Creek and into an unnamed tributary to Keith Cove Creek in Franklin County. The operator has certified that there will be no changes to the wastewater and storm water treatment systems and has requested permit renewal based on current "Approved" plans.

Rogers Group, Inc., P. O. Box 25250, Nashville, TN 37202-5250. Cross Plains Quarry, NPDES Permit TN0072028. This existing limestone quarry and processing facility, located at latitude 36_32_21_, longitude 86_38_35_, discharges treated wastewater and storm water to an unnamed tributary of the South Fork of the Red River in Robertson County.

Rogers Group, Inc., P. O. Box 25250, Nashville, TN 37202-5250. Grundy County Quarry, NPDES Permit TN0066541. This existing limestone quarry and processing facility, located at latitude 35_22_10_, longitude 85_49_27_, discharges treated wastewater and storm water to an unnamed tributary of Jay Creek in Grundy County.

Rogers Group, Inc., P. O. Box 25250, Nashville, TN 37202. Sparta Quarry, NPDES Permit TN0063509. This existing limestone quarry and processing facility, located at latitude 35_56_ 52_, longitude 85_30_15_, discharges treated wastewater and storm water into the groundwater via unimproved sinkholes in White County. The operator has certified that there will be no changes to the wastewater and storm water treatment systems and has requested permit renewal based on current "Approved" plans.

Vulcan Construction Materials, LP, Airpark II, Suite B-19, 1410 Donelson Pike, Nashville, TN 37217-2983. River Road Quarry, NPDES Permit TN0003549. This existing limestone quarry and processing facility with an asphalt concrete plant, located at latitude 36_07_51_, longitude 86_55_02_, discharges treated wastewater and storm water to Overall Creek in Davidson County.

Non-Coal Proposed Termination
Nolichuckey Sand Company, Inc., 1980 Greystone Road, Greeneville, TN 37743. Nolichuckey River Dredging Operation (Site 1), NPDES Permit TN0065846. This former sand and gravel river dredge operation located at latitude 36_09_20_, longitude 82_43_15_, discharged treated wastewater and storm water to the Nolichuckey River at River Mile 60 in Greene County. The site is inactive and onshore processing equipment has been removed.

Coal Proposed Issuance
Tennessee Mining, Inc., P. O. Box 465, Jacksboro, TN 37757. SRS Surface Mine, NPDES Permit TN0076198, SMCRA Permit 3066. This proposed surface coal mine, located at latitude 36o04_08_, longitude 84o23_54_, will discharge treated wastewater and storm water to Hundred Acre Hollow and Prudential Hollow in Morgan County.

Coal Proposed Reissuance
Consolidation Coal Company, P. O. Box 1289, Bluefield, VA 24605. Matthews Mining Complex, NPDES Permit TN0048895, SMCRA Permit 2449. This reclaimed underground coal mine and preparation plant, located at latitude 36_29_39_, longitude 83_53_07_, discharges treated wastewater and storm water to Tackett Creek and Spruce Lick Creek in Claiborne County. The operator has certified that there will be no changes to the wastewater and storm water treatment systems and has requested permit renewal based on current "Approved" plans.

Coal Proposed Reclamation
East Fork, 116 Green Acres, Jamestown, TN 38553. Area 1, NPDES Permit TN0063398, SMCRA Permit 2853. This reclaimed surface coal mine, located at latitude 36_17_26_, longitude 84_57_32_, discharges treated wastewater and storm water to Fern Camp Creek in Fentress County.

Source: http://www.state.tn.us/environment/wpc/wpcppo/mining/

16) PUBLIC NOTICE: Aquatic Resource Alteration Permit (ARAP) Notices
The following is a list of Public Notices from TDEC of permitting decisions, public hearings, and rulemaking activities. Public comment and participation are encouraged on all of these issues. Comments must be received within 30 days of the date that the notice is posted. Comments on any issue are welcome at any time and may be made by sending e-mail to [email protected]
April 14, 2003
NRS02.480 Pikeville Natural Gas Systems; multiple gas line crossings, Sequatchie River, Skillern Creek, Cove Branch, Hall Creek and Unnamed Tributaries to Hall Creek, Cove Branch and Sequatchie River, Bledsoe County

NRS03.017 TDOT SR139; Channel Relocation Crowder Branch, Jefferson County, TN, TDOT # 35009-1228-94

NRS03.028 Harpeth Valley Utilities District, main trunk gravity sewer interceptor; Overall Creek, tributary to Cumberland River, in Bellevue, Davidson County

NRS03.034 TDOT SR125; Bridge and Approaches Over Piney Creek and Channel Relocation, Hardeman County, TN TDOT#35009-1228-94

NRS03.076 TDOT Feathers Chapel Rd.; Bridge and Approaches over branch of Treadville Creek, Fayette County, TN TDOT#24022-1412-94

NRS03.079 Madison County Highway Department; channel relocation and encapsulation for Ridgecrest Road Project Extension, Unnamed tributary to Johnson Creek, Madison County

NRS03.086 Wal-Mart Real Estate Business Trust; Culvert and fill, Unnamed Tributary to Meridian Creek and Adjacent Wetlands in Madison County

NRS03.101 TDOT SR-100; Road Widening; Sleepy Hollow Creek/Overby Branch, Williamson County, TN, TDOT#94013-1207-04

NRS03.139 TDOT SR-160/348; Maintenance; Mink Creek, Cocke and Greene County, TN. TDOT#98014-4272-04
March 28, 2003
NRS02-166 Town of Jonesborough, two crossings for gravity sewer line, Unnamed Tributary to Little Limestone Creek, Washington County
March 21, 2003
NRS02.136 Mr. Charles Crews, proposed earthen dam and 70 acre impoundment, Inman Branch, near Fairview in Williamson County

NRS03.009 Town of Jonesborough, multiple crossings for gravity sewer line, Little Limestone Creek and unnamed tributary to Little Limestone Creek, Washington County

NRS03.053 Middle Tennessee Natural Gas Utility District, multiple crossings with natural gas pipeline, East Fork Stones River and tributaries and several other named and unnamed tributaries and wetlands along the pipeline alignment. The project is located in Cannon, DeKalb, and Warren Counties.
Source: http://www.tennessee.gov/environment/wpc/wpcppo/arap/
17) PUBLIC NOTICE: US Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District Permit Notices
The following is a list of Public Notices issued by the US Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District for work in waters of the United States. The notices listed are for applications currently under review. All work is proposed unless otherwise noted. If you wish to obtain a copy of a particular notice, you can contact our office at (615) 369-7500 or by mail and we will be happy to forward it to you. Be sure to include the Public Notice Number with your request.
U.S. Army Engineer District, Nashville
Corps of Engineers
Attention: Regulatory Branch
3701 Bell Road
Nashville, Tennessee 37214

Notice No.

03-34 - Expires 5/16/2003, Town of Grant, AL, Proposed Municipal Wastewater Outfall, Tennessee River Mile 370.2R, Guntersville Lake, Marshall County, AL

03-27 - Expires 5/16/2003, Kay Archer, Proposed Access Dredging, Private Boat Dock, and Boat Ramp, Muddy Creek, Opposite French Broad River Mile 41.0L, Jefferson County, TN
03-35 - Expires 5/19/2003, Kentucky Transportation Cabinet, Proposed Overpass, Sinking Creek, Somerset, Pulaski County, KY
03-33 - Expires 5/14/2003, Teague Brothers Sand and Gravel, Inc., Proposed Commercial Sand and Gravel Dredging, Tennessee River Miles 112.0 to 121.0; 126.0 to 128.5; 128.5 to 130.0 left descending bank; 130.0 to 135.0; 136.0 to 140.0; 143.5 to 144.0 left descending bank; 144.0 to 145.5; 147.0 to 148.5; 150.0 to 152.0; 155.5 to 156.5; 172.0 to 173.0; 173.0 to 176.5 left descending bank; 176.5 to 182.0; 184.0 to 189.0; 193.0 to 194.0; 194.0 to 195.0 left descending bank, Harding, Perry, Humphreys, and Decatur Counties, TN
03-32 - Expires 5/5/2003, Wal-Mart Stores, Inc., Proposed Wetland Development Fill, Burtons Branch, Putnam County, TN
03-26 - Expires 5/4/2003, Chapman Certified Properties, L.P., Proposed Channel Fill and Channel Relocation, Unnamed Tributary to Stock Creek, Little River Mile 3.1R, Knox County, TN
03-31 - Expires 5/2/2003, Woodhaven on the Lake, Proposed Dredging for Private Docks, East Station Camp Creek Mile 3.0R, Opposite Cumberland River Mile 237.0R, Old Hickory Lake, Sumner County, TN
03-29 - Expires 5/3/2003, Home Depot U.S.A., Inc., Proposed Channel Fill and Adjacent Wetland Fill, Unnamed Tributary to South Mouse Creek, Bradley County, TN
03-28 - Expires 4/29/2003, Russell A. Goodwin, Goodmar, Inc., Proposed Riprap Breakwater Extension at Harbor Hill Marina, Tennessee River Mile 44.7L, Kentucky Lake, Calloway County, TN
03-25 - Expires 4/19/2003, Edgar L. Stinnett, Proposed and Existing Wetland Fill, Banyon Creek Mile 35, Opposite Brier Fork of the Flint River Mile at Mile 12.1R, Madison County, AL
03-24 - Expires 4/21/2003, City of Huntsville, Proposed Discharge of Fill Material Associated with Pipe Culvert Placement, Unnamed Tributary to Aldridge Creek Mile 4.2L, Opposite Tennessee River Mile 333.5R, Madison County, AL
03-23 - Expires 4/19/2003, City of Harriman, Proposed Channel Fill and Adjacent Wetland Fill, Unnamed Tributaries to King Creek Opposite Clinch River Mile 2.7R, Roane County, TN
Source: http://www.orn.usace.army.mil/cof/notices.htm

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