March 24, 2003

1) TCWN WORKING FOR YOU! Building Partnerships in the Emory River Watershed
2) ACTION ALERT: Help Improve Clean Water Goals for Tennessee!
3) ACTION ALERT: Threats to the Clean Water Act
4) ACTION ALERT: Support the Public's Right to Know About Environmental Compliance and Enforcement
5) ACTION ALERT: Protect Big South Fork National River
6) ACTION ALERT: Road Projects To Be Reviewed by UT's Transportation Center
7) EVENT: Tennessee Watershed Roundtable, March 27-28
8) EVENT: River Network's National River Rally, May 9-13
9) NEWS: New GAO Report Investigates Designated Uses and Water Quality Criteria
10) NEWS: Funds Available NOW for Green Infrastructure and Low Impact Development Projects
11) NEWS: Environmentalists Sue EPA Over New Factory Farm Pollution Rule
12) NEWS: Community Source Water Protection Initiative
13) NEWS: Federal Clean Water Funding:
14) RESOURCE: Transportation Enhancement Program Grants Available
15) RESOURCE: Conservation Fund Offers Kodak American Greenways Awards
16) RESOURCE: Grant Opportunities
17) RESOURCE: USGS Announces Online Access to Nationwide Fish Community Data
18) RESOURCE: Impacts of Impervious Cover on Aquatic Systems
19) PUBLIC NOTICE: NPDES Permits
20) PUBLIC NOTICE: TDEC Mining Section NPDES Permits
21) PUBLIC NOTICE: Aquatic Resource Alteration Permit (ARAP) Notices
22) PUBLIC NOTICE: US Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District Permit Notices


1) TCWN WORKING FOR YOU! Building Partnerships in the Emory River Watershed
Tennessee Clean Water Network, National Parks Conservation Association, The Nature Conservancy, Emory River Watershed Association, and Morgan County Chamber of Commerce have initiated an effort to pull together interested people within Morgan County to look for opportunities to protect natural resources and spark economic development. The first meeting of the Emory-Obed Forum was held on March 10, 2003 in Wartburg. At this meeting, a diverse group of local leaders began to explore opportunities to: 1) ensure the vitality of the area's natural resources into the future, and 2) develop economic strategies that build on these natural resources. The group brainstormed possibilities for nature-based tourism in Morgan County, briefly assessed the potential for nature-based tourism, discussed concerns over the health of natural resources, and suggested ideas for short-term projects. Over the next three months, this group will continue to engage in discussion about long-term plans; seek funding to support the effort; and work on a practical project with short-term benefits. By building innovative partnerships and identifying common ground, the Forum will look for opportunities to demonstrate that a healthy environment and a healthy economy can go hand in hand.

2) ACTION ALERT: Help Improve Clean Water Goals for Tennessee!
Talking points for upcoming hearings (dates listed below) are available at www.tcwn.org.

Come out and show your support for protecting and restoring Tennessee's waters. Nine more public hearings will be held across the state in March and April to provide citizens with the opportunity to discuss and comment on the State's proposed revisions to Tennessee's water quality standards.
Why is this important? These standards are the backbone of the Clean Water Act. They determine which waters must be clean up, how much they must be cleaned up, and which clean waters need protection. A strong showing at these hearings will demonstrate that people in Tennessee care about clean water! Pass the word and encourage your friends and colleagues to attend as well.

Please mark your calendars now. Public hearings will be held across the state on the following dates:
March 24, Nashville, 1:30 pm CST
Ruth Neff Conference Room, 17th Floor, L&C Tower, 401 Church Street

March 25, Franklin, 7:00 pm CST
Auditorium, Williamson County Administrative Complex, 100 West Main Street

March 27, Chattanooga, 2:00 pm EST
Chattanooga State Office Building, First Floor Auditorium, 540 McCallie Avenue

March 27, Chattanooga, 6:30 pm EST
Chattanooga State Office Building, First Floor Auditorium, 540 McCallie Avenue

March 31, Knoxville, 1:30 pm EST
Main Conference Room, Knoxville Environmental Assistance Center, 2700 Middlebrook Pike

March 31, Knoxville, 7:00 pm EST
Goins Building Auditorium, Pellissippi State Technical Institute, Pellissippi Parkway

April 1, Kingsport, 2:00 pm EST
Conference Room, Warriors Path State Park, Hemlock Road

April 1, Elizabethton, 7:00 pm EST
Conference Room, Sycamore Shoals State Park, 1651 West Elk Avenue

April 3, Cookeville, 7:00 pm CST
Biology Department, Pennybaker Hall, Room 128, Tennessee Tech University

Written comments will be accepted until close of business on April 4, 2003. Comments should be directed to:
Mr. Greg Denton
Division of Water Pollution Control
Planning and Standards Section
6th Floor, L&C Annex
401 Church Street
Nashville, TN 37243
Fax: 615-532-0045
Email: [email protected]

The proposed revisions to standards can be accessed at http://www.state.tn.us/environment/water.htm

Background:
Every three years, the State of Tennessee holds public hearings on the adequacy of its water quality standards. These standards establish the baseline for how the state conducts regular business involved the discharge of pollution into our lakes, rivers, and streams. During this review period, known as the Triennial Review, the entire state water quality standards system is up for analysis, debate, and revision. This is the public's best chance to comment on individual pieces of the system, including:
· the state's designated uses and classifications (Tennessee's designated uses include: domestic water supply, industrial water supply, fish and aquatic life protection, recreation, irrigation, livestock, navigation, trout, and naturally reproducing trout stream);
· the criteria associated with its classifications (e.g., numeric and narrative criteria for dissolved oxygen, pH, turbidity, temperature, coliform, & toxic substances);
· the classifications of specific water bodies and any site-specific criteria; and
· the antidegradation policy and implementation system.

Water quality standards define the goals and limits for all waters in the state. Practically speaking, they drive the development of water quality-based discharge permits and determine which clean waters need protection. Consequently, they drive many restoration and protection activities in a watershed over the long term.

Antidegradation is an important part of Tennessee's water quality standards. While designated uses and water quality criteria provide minimum goals for a water body, antidegradation provides a framework for protecting hard-won gains once those goals are reached. Equally important, it provides a system for protecting the good quality of waters that have always met or exceeded their standards. Up until the initiation of the litigation surrounding the Spencer Sewage Treatment Plant, Tennessee's antidegradation policy has not been a subject for detailed public discussion. In part due to the victory in the Spencer litigation, we now have an opportunity to help shape this critical part of Tennessee's policy. We need your support!
Help get the message out that people in Tennessee want protective water quality standards and a strong antidegradation policy for the state's higher quality waters.

3) ACTION ALERT: Threats to the Clean Water Act
The health of our streams, wetlands and other waters - and the important benefits they provide
to people and wildlife - is at risk. Specifically, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) took action in January that immediately weakened protections for many waters and opened up the possibility of further changes to the jurisdiction of the Clean Water Act through an Advance Notice of Proposed Rule Making.

For more background on this issue, visit
http://www.americanrivers.org/waterquality/cleanwateract.htm

There are two important new developments that you should be aware of:
1) Public comment deadline extension - The EPA and the Corps announced February 28 in the Federal Register that the deadline for public comments on the Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking has been extended by 45 days. This will move the deadline from March 3rd to April 16th. A vocal and forceful response from the river community to this notice is critical to protecting the Clean Water Act. We need both mass comments from individuals and substantive comments from river groups with details on what changes to the Clean Water Act could mean for the rivers, streams, and wetlands in your backyard. American Rivers and other members of the river community are working on draft sample comments for river groups that will be made
available as soon as possible. In the meantime, you can help drive large numbers of comments by encouraging your members, volunteers, etc. to submit a simple comment letter at
http://amriversaction.ctsg.com/wac/index.asp?step=2&item=2454

2) Positive legislation introduced in Congress - On Thursday, February 27, Senators Feingold (D-WI), Boxer (D-CA) and Jeffords (I-VT), and Representatives Oberstar (D-MN), Dingell (D-MI), Leach (R-IA), and Boehlert (R-NY) reintroduced the "Clean Water Authority Restoration Act." This is a legislative fix designed to restore the Clean Water Act's authority over all waters of the United States. If passed, this bill would trump the actions being taken by the EPA and the Corps described above. We need your help generating support for this bill in both the Senate and the House. Please urge your members of Congress to sign on as co-sponsors of this bill. To
find contact information for your Senators and Representative, visit
http://amriversaction.ctsg.com/directory/index.asp

Source: RiverInfo - a River Network listserve

4) ACTION ALERT: Support the Public's Right to Know About Environmental Compliance and Enforcement
Support your right to know if factories and plants in your community are good corporate citizens or law-breakers. Please let the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) hear that you support their initiative to keep the public informed by maintaining an online database of compliance records for more than 800,000 regulated facilities nationwide, including those disposing of pollutants in rivers and streams.

The Enforcement and Compliance History Online (ECHO) database, http://www.epa.gov/echo, provides compliance data under the Clean Water Act (CWA), Clean Air Act (CAA), and Resource and Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), as well as links to additional state
compliance information. Specifically, the database provides inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities for the past two years.

The EPA has been trying out this public information system, and is now accepting comments on whether or not to continue this service. Use American Rivers sample letter as the basis for your own comments. Visit http://www.americanrivers.org/takeaction/. Comments must be submitted no later than March 31, 2003.

Source: American Rivers Policy Update

5) ACTION ALERT: Protect Big South Fork National River
Attend one of the Open Houses on the BSF Draft General Management Plan (GMP) being held by the National Park Service (NPS):
March 24, Stearns, KY: Whitley City Middle School
March 25, Allardt, TN: Allardt Elementary School
All run from 6-9 p.m., local time. NPS staff will assist with locating information in the Draft GMP. Attendees can make comments, either by writing on forms, or orally to a court recorder.

Below are some important points you may wish to make at these Open Houses to prevent over-use of the Big South Fork NRRA. We strongly urge you to comment on the Draft GMP one way or another -- at an Open House (written or oral) and/or in writing by May 15. The future management of the BSFNRRA for the next 15 years, or so, is at stake! (The GMP is available at
http://www.nps.gov/biso/gmp/gmp.htm)

POINTS FOR COMMENTS AT OPEN HOUSES
1. Overall, we support Alternative D, which allows uses according to zones. Establishment of the zones was based on study of the resources of the BSFNRRA.

2. There are already almost 300 miles of road throughout the Area. No additional use of motorized vehicles should be permitted on trails. Motorized vehicles should be barred from "multi-use trails" -- allow only horses, bikers, and hikers on such trails (which occupy a total of 28 miles, widely dispersed throughout the Area).

3. ATVs (All Terrain Vehicles) are permitted to use: (a) routes in the "OHV (Off-Highway Vehicle) Planning Areas" on Darrow Ridge year-round, (b) "seasonal trails" (a total of 20 widely dispersed miles) for hunting activities during big-game hunting seasons (which can occupy several months of the year). The Draft GMP refers to the OHV Planning Areas as "initially identified," implying that, at some future date, additional ones could be identified administratively (without public review) elsewhere in the Natural Environment Recreation Zone, which covers the bulk of the BSFNRRA. The GMP should make it clear that no additional OHV Planning Areas will be identified in the future.

4. The Draft GMP proposes a major proliferation of trails and accesses. Accesses would almost double (from 24 to 44). Trail mileage would increase by 32% overall over current designation, and horse trails by a whopping 44%. Altogether, 205 miles (+ 20 miles seasonally) would be available for horses; this seems excessive. The Draft should be modified so as to allow a significant portion(s) of the BSFNRRA to have lower trail densities and fewer accesses.

Source: Chota listserve

6) ACTION ALERT: Road Projects To Be Reviewed by UT's Transportation Center
The University of Tennessee's Transportation Center will be reviewing 15 road projects planned by the Tennessee Department of Transportation (including one on Hwy 127 South through the Cumberland Homesteads Historic district). They are accepting written comments and requests for information. The Transporation Center will respond to each written inquiry/contact submitted and will review any materials submitted. They also intend to hold a public meeting in the area of each of the 15 road projects being reviewed.

For more information contact Dr. Steve Richards, Exec. Director, Center for Transportation Research, University of Tennessee, 309 Conference Center, Knoxville, TN 37996 or Kathleen Ramsey, Communications Coordinator, phone # 865-974-1812, [email protected]

Source: email from Mary Mastin


7) EVENT: Tennessee Watershed Roundtable, March 27-28, 2003
Tennessee's 2nd Annual Watershed Roundtable
Working Together For Measurable Water Quality Results

What are the Roundtable objectives?
1. Raise awareness of watershed issues and resources
2. Build trust and linkages among partners to leverage resources
3. Provide tools to support watershed and community development

When? March 27-28, 2003
Where? Nashville, Millennium Maxwell House 615-313-1327

For additional information contact:
Geri Spring, Southeast Watershed Forum
2011 Wisteria Drive Hixson, TN 37343
Phone: 423-843-3001 Fax: 423-843-3009
[email protected]

Background: The Tennessee Watershed Roundtable is a program designed to bring together a broad spectrum of interests from the public and private sectors to discuss the important issues related to water resource management and to develop action plans and partnerships necessary to address those issues. The emphasis in this second statewide Watershed Roundtable will be on building plans to achieve measurable water quality in impaired streams. Facilitated breakout sessions will bring business leaders, city planners, watershed organizations, farmers, and government agencies together to identify priority streams on which to partner and plan a restoration project. Projects that demonstrate real results will be considered for 319 Nonpoint Source grants.

Source: Email from Christine Olsenius

8) EVENT: River Network's National River Rally, May 9-13, 2003
River Rally registration closes on March 27, 2003. Avoid a $50 late fee and
register today! For details, visit the rally registration page
http://www.rivernetwork.org/howwecanhelp/howrally.cfm

Why come?
* Learn the basics of river and watershed protection, or explore new policy
initiatives, cutting-edge techniques and in-depth case studies
* Find out how to start a new organization, build excellence in an
established group, foster a healthy working environment, communicate with
the public, and raise funds
* Meet colleagues who have common interests and enlightening experiences to
share
* Talk with funders about the current funding climate and how to find
support for your organization or project
* Inspire new staff, board members and volunteers and bring them up to speed
on river and watershed issues
* Renew and reinvigorate yourself for the work ahead.

The River Rally is the only comprehensive conference that offers workshops for all those working to understand, restore, and protect rivers. The event will be help 35 miles from the Portland airport, in the heart of the Columbia River Gorge, at Skamania Lodge, an outstanding facility with super outdoor recreational opportunities.

For additional information, contact:
[email protected]
www.rivernetwork.org
1-800-639-8108

Source: RiverInfo - a listserve of River Network

9) NEWS: New GAO Report Investigates Designated Uses and Water Quality Criteria
The Government Accounting Office (GAO) released a report this month on water quality standards, "Water Quality: Improved EPA Guidance and Support Can Help States Develop Standards that Better Target Cleanup Efforts." Representative Duncan (R-TN), the Chairman of the House's Subcommittee on Water Resources and the Environment, requested this report.

Designated Uses: The report finds that the use of designated use changes varies from state to state. Between 1997 and 2001, some states made zero use changes while others made more than 1,000. Many states reported that they would make more designated use changes except for their uncertain about requirements for U.S. EPA approval. Forty-three percent of states reported they needed additional guidance on how and when to make changes. The states also reported that U.S. EPA's standards for use changes vary by region, resulting in inconsistent requirements. Note: the report contains an interesting state-by-state summary map of recent use changes.

Time and again, the report makes the point that different waterbodies would be slated from cleanup through the Total Maximum Daily Load program if designated uses were changed. For example, 22 states reported that different waterbodies would be scheduled for TMDL development if the process for changing uses were "improved."

Criteria: The report finds that states report a need for additional water quality criteria for key pollutants - particularly sediment, nutrients, and bacteria. In addition, states reported problems with setting criteria in a manner that allows them to compare the criteria with obtainable
monitoring data. Lastly, states reported difficulty in modifying their existing criteria when new information is available - with 43 states reporting it is "somewhat" to "very" difficult to modify criteria.

Recommendations: While the report does acknowledge that the reported problems stem at
least in part from issues such as state budgets and interest group pressure, GAO's recommendations focus on U.S. EPA's role. The GAO's recommendations include:
· EPA should provide guidance regarding use changes.
· EPA should establish a clearinghouse of approved use changes
· EPA should establish a time frame for developing sediment criteria.
· EPA should develop monitoring strategies that states can use to determine if waterbodies are meeting criteria.
· EPA should develop guidance and training to address regional inconsistencies in requirements for use changes.

To read the report yourself, visit http://www.gao.gov/cgi-bin/getrpt?GAO-03-308

Source: Clean Water Network Status Report

10) NEWS: Funds Available NOW for Green Infrastructure and Low Impact Development Projects
In its FY 2003 federal Omnibus spending bill, Congress set aside $75 million in available loans for innovative stormwater control, wastewater treatment, and low impact development projects. States will administer this funding. It will mainly go to municipalities who can work with non-profits to implement green infrastructure projects: "$75,000,000 shall be available for loans, including interest free loans ... to municipal, inter-municipal, interstate, or State agencies or nonprofit entities for projects that provide treatment for or that minimize sewage or stormwater discharges using one or more approaches which include, but are not limited to, decentralized or distributed stormwater controls, decentralized wastewater treatment, low-impact development practices, conservation easements, stream buffers, or wetlands restoration."

This is FY 03 money that EPA will be distributing by the end of September. These funds will be distributed through the State Revolving Fund, and so contact your state or local SRF coordinator to find out how to apply for this funding. To view a list of state SRF contacts, go to
http://www.epa.gov/owm/cwfinance/cwsrf/contacts.htm

Source: Clean Water Network Status Report

11) NEWS: Environmentalists Sue EPA Over New Factory Farm Pollution Rule
A new Bush administration farm pollution rule violates the Clean Water Act by allowing large-scale livestock farms to continue to foul the nation's waterways with animal waste, according to a lawsuit filed late Friday by three environmental organizations. Among other things, the groups charge the new rule shields factory farms from liability for damage caused by animal waste pollution. The groups, Sierra Club, Natural Resources Defense Council, and the Waterkeeper Alliance filed the suit in San Francisco's Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. The new rule was issued by the Environmental Protection Agency in mid-December under a 1992 consent decree between the agency and NRDC.

Thirty years ago, Congress identified concentrated animal feeding operations as point sources of water pollution to be regulated under the Clean Water Act's water pollution permitting program. The scale of animal production at individual operations has dramatically increased since then, and factory farms today produce 500 million tons of manure a year. As a result, the regulations that EPA developed in the 1970s are outdated and inadequate. The Clinton EPA proposed a new rule with initiatives that would have protected the environment, but the Bush administration stripped them from the final rule after agribusinesses complained.

Under the Bush administration rule, animal factories can continue to dump millions of gallons of liquefied manure into open pits, called lagoons, and then spray the liquid over fields. Typically the manure runs off the fields into nearby streams or seeps into underground water supplies, polluting water with viruses, bacteria, pesticides, antibiotics, hormones and excessive nutrients. The rule exempts this contaminated runoff from Clean Water Act standards by calling it "agricultural stormwater."

The Clean Water Act requires industrial animal factories to obtain permits limiting discharges of animal waste into waterways. Under the Bush rule, however, factory farms write the part of their permits that limit spraying manure on fields without state or federal review or approval - and without notifying the public. The new rule also does not require factory farms to monitor groundwater or prevent animal waste from leaking into groundwater and contaminating drinking water wells.

Environmentalists had urged EPA to adopt a rule that would keep animal waste out of rivers and lakes, hold corporate owners responsible for spills, and guarantee adequate public participation. The groups say EPA's new rule fails to meet these basic requirements.

Source: Clean Water Network listserve

12) NEWS: Community Source Water Protection Initiative
Clean Water Network, the Campaign for Safe and Affordable Drinking Water, and the Clean Water Fund are partnering in an exciting new project to promote source water protection activities in communities nationwide. States are required to complete Source Water Assessments; the challenge for communities concerned about clean and safe water is to move beyond assessment towards using the many laws and programs available to protect drinking water at the source. The new project will emphasize providing CWN members with information, tools, training, and support to develop models for source water protection activities.

Key activities of the Initiative are:
1. Regional Training Conferences: In the first year of the grant there will be four or five regional training conferences of 50-100 people to train community leaders and activists in resources that are available for source water protection and how to use them.

2. Toolkit/Checklist: The Citizens Source Water Protection
Toolkit/Checklist will be a paper and on-line guide to resources for working on source water protection, including information on relevant Clean Water Act and Safe Drinking Water Act programs and how to use them. The Checklist will enable a community to match local water
challenges with programs to address them, and the Toolkit will include a bibliography of resources to help them understand and implement the programs and tools.

3. Scoping Meeting: On April 3-4, 2003, a core group (30) of leaders from around the country will review project plans, prepare training conference curriculum, and recommend improvements and additions to the Coordination Team.

4. Regional and Local Mini-Grants: Funding is available for $500 - $5000 mini-grants to qualifying organizations for source water protection activities. These will be especially geared toward:
· organizations implementing projects envisioned in the regional training conferences;
· activities that will result in increased focus on source water protection in a specific utility;
· activities that will result in further dissemination of the Toolkit/Checklist and of the skills acquired in the training conferences.
The application process will be simple and straightforward and will be managed and overseen by the Clean Water Network and modeled on their State Assistance Fund program. Organizations must be 501C-3 or be sponsored by a 501C-3 to receive the mini-grants.

5. Coordination and Technical Assistance: National and regional teams will oversee all aspects of the Initiative and provide for coordination and technical assistance to the extent possible for follow-up activities on the local, state and regional level. Some funding will be available for
in-depth local training and technical assistance around specialized topics like regulatory programs (e.g. TMDL's) and GIS mapping.

For more information contact Eddie Scher, Clean Water Network, 202-289-2395, [email protected]

Source: Clean Water Network Status Report

13) NEWS: Federal Clean Water Funding
Congress Approves FY03 Budget; Bush Administration Proposes FY04 Budget

Despite the Bush administration's FY 03 proposal to cut funding for critical environmental programs, Congress finally passed its joint resolution on the 2003 budget on February 10, restoring funding for most clean water programs at EPA and USGS. Unfortunately, the bill contained significant cuts in conservation spending at USDA. We'll face another battle for clean water funding for FY 2004, as President Bush delivered his latest proposed budget for FY04 to Congress that again cuts critically needed funding.

To view actual bill language, go to http://www.house.gov/rules/108_hjres2cr_text.htm

FISCAL YEAR 2003 EPA APPROPRIATIONS
Overall EPA FY 2003 budget:
· $8.13 billion total ($420 million more than the Bush FY03 request and a $125 million increase over FY 2002 appropriations)

FY 2003 Grants and State Revolving Fund (SRF) Funding:
· $1.35 billion for Clean Water SRF (same as FY 02 enacted budget; $133 million more than
FY03 request by Bush administration
· $850 million for Safe Drinking Water SRFs (same as FY 02 enacted budget; same as Bush administration request for FY03)
· $240 million for section 319 grants (+3 million above FY 02 enacted budget; $1.5 million more than Bush administration request for FY03)
· $192.5 million for section 106 grants (+0.5 million above FY 02 budget; $12.1 million more than FY03 request by Bush administration)

FY 2003 EPA Enforcement:
· $182 million (-$1.1 million below FY 02 budget; $5 million more than FY03 request by Bush administration)

FY 2003 Watershed Initiative:
· $15 million (-$6 million below FY 03 request by Bush administration)

FY 2004 EPA PROPOSED BUDGET - DEEP CUTS FOR CLEAN WATER
Overall EPA FY 2004 request by President: $7.6 billion ($500 million less than FY03 final appropriation).
Overall, funding for the agency would be slashed by half a billion dollars between FY 2003 and FY 2004 -- dropping from $8.1 billion to $7.6 billion. Although there would be a slight increase for operating programs and Superfund cleanup, water quality work at the agency would be cut a whopping $861 million from the amount Congress provided in FY 2002. Water quality investments at the agency would tumble from a total of $2,659 million in FY 2002 to only $1,798 million in FY 2004 -- a loss of $861 million, or more than 32 percent.

The Clean Water Act State Revolving Fund (CWASRF) takes the biggest hit. Bush's budget for CWASRF would decline by $500 million, from $1,350 million in FY 2003 to only $850 million in FY 2004. The Safe Drinking Water Act State Revolving Fund would remain unchanged at $850 million -- still far below annual needs.

EPA continues to seek major cutbacks in enforcement personnel from the levels in place at the start of the administration -- reducing the total workforce by nearly 100 positions (more than 6 percent). Between FY 2001 and FY 2003, the Bush administration has pursued a strategy of
ratcheting down enforcement efforts by eliminating about 200 positions from the key activities of compliance monitoring and civil enforcement. It has accomplished this through a combination of leaving vacancies unfilled and reassigning personnel. Bush's FY 2004 budget proposes an increase of about 100 positions to the administration's FY 2003 request, but that still translates into a reduction of nearly 100 from the FY 2001 level. More importantly, EPA had projected that the amount of pollution reduced by enforcement actions would plunge from 660 million pounds in FY 2001 to only 300 million pounds a year. This estimate turned out to be overly optimistic: Last week the agency confirmed that its enforcement actions had reduced pollution by a mere 261 million pounds in FY 2002

FY 2003 USGS APPROPRIATIONS
The FY 2003 budget for the U.S. Geological Survey remains in tact compared to FY 02 spending levels. For water resources programs, overall FY 03 spending increased $2.7 million.

Overall USGS FY 2003 budget:
· $919 million (+$5.2 million increase over FY 2002 appropriations; $52
million more than the President's FY03 request)

Toxic Substances Hydrology Program:
· $13.5 million (-$400,000 from FY 2002 enacted budget; President
requested that the Program receive no funding for FY 2003)

National Water Quality Assessment:
· $63.6 million ($500,000 above FY 2002 enacted budget; $6.3 million
more than FY03 request by Bush administration)

National Streamflow Information Program:
· $14.3 million (same as FY 2002 appropriation; $2.1 million more than
FY03 request by Bush administration)

Water Resources Research Act Program:
· $6 million (same as FY 2002 appropriation; President requested that
the Program receive no funding for FY 2003)

FY 2004 USGS PROPOSED BUDGET
Overall FY 2004 Budget Request:
· $895.5 million ($23.5 million less than final FY 03 appropriation)

Toxic Substances Hydrology Program: $11 million
National Water Quality Assessment: $63.8 million
National Streamflow Information Program: $14.3 million
Water Resources Research Act Program: $0

To print a PDF copy of this information, go to: http://www.cwn.org/docs/issues/federalcwfunding.pdf

Source: Clean Water Network listserve

14) RESOURCE: Transportation Enhancement Program Grants Available
The Department of Transportation is accepting grant applications for the Transportation Enhancement Program for Fiscal Year 2004. This program is an 80/20 matching grant and available for development of greenways, trails, etc. You can download the application at www.tdot.state.tn.us or contact Ms. Maria Hunter at 615-532-3632 for a hard copy of the application.

Deadline for applications to be postmarked is midnight July 1, 2003.

15) RESOURCE: Conservation Fund Offers Kodak American Greenways Awards
Deadline: June 1, 2003
The Kodak American Greenways Awards, a partnership project of the Eastman Kodak Company, the Conservation Fund, and the National Geographic Society, provides small grants to stimulate the planning and design of greenways in communities throughout America. The awards are designed to develop new, action-oriented greenway projects; assist grassroots greenway organizations; leverage additional money for conservation and greenway development; and recognize and encourage greenway proponents and organizations.
Grants may be used for activities such as mapping, ecological assessments, surveying, conferences, and design activities; developing brochures, interpretative displays, audio-visual productions, or public opinion surveys; hiring consultants; incorporating land trusts; and/or building foot bridges, planning bike paths, and other creative projects. In general, grants can be used for all appropriate expenses needed to complete a greenway project, including planning, technical assistance, legal, and other costs. Awards will primarily go to local, regional, or statewide nonprofit organizations.
Although public agencies may also apply, community organizations will receive preference. The maximum grant is $2,500, though most grants will range from $500 to $1,000. Applications may be submitted online from March 1 to June 1 of each calendar year. For complete application instructions and to review descriptions of previously awarded projects, see the Conservation Fund Web site: http://www.conservationfund.org/?article=2701&back=true
Source: Email from Misty Goins
16) RESOURCE: Grant Opportunities
National Wildlife Refuge Support Group Grant Program 2003: This program is designed to complement the Refuge Centennial and serves to provide: (1) start up; (2) capacity building; or (3) project specific grants to NWR Friends groups, Cooperative Associations, Audubon Chapters or other groups interested in assisting a NWR. Grants typically range from $1.5 - 5K. The application form as well as Guidelines for writing and submitting a competitive proposal are available on the NFWF website: www.nfwf.org.
Wildlife Links: This grant program funds projects that address research or management priorities that also embody an environmental educational component on golf courses. The
overall goal of the program is to strengthen partnerships with the golfing industry by working together to enhance wildlife, fish and plants on golf courses.

Migratory Bird Conservancy: Relatively new partnership funded by donations from birding
businesses and their customers and matching funds provided by the NFWF. Applicants are required to provide matching funds at a 1:1 level. This program funds projects that address conservation of priority bird habitat in the Western hemisphere and may include land acquisition, restoration, and improved habitat management. Web site: www.conservebirds.org/grants

The Nature of Learning Start-Up Grants: NOTE: NEW community based environmental
education initiative at the NFWF. Partners include the NFWF, FWS's NWRS, the NCTC, The Keystone Center and NWR Association. Project applications are to be for starting "The Nature of Learning" env'l educational program in the local area and using the NWR to gain educational field experience for students. Grants will be from $1 - 5K in size, and although matching funds are not required, leveraging of funding is encouraged. Those eligible to apply include: Audubon Society; local Friends Group; local school; community group. Program must involve a partnership among a local school, community group and the refuge. Web site: www.nfwf.org or
[email protected]

Patagonia: Small grants from $3 - 8K are available for environmental projects that focus
on root causes, build public involvement and are action-oriented. They do NOT fund research,
general env'l educational efforts or research. Focus is on funding local groups in addressing
local environmental problems. Web site: www.patagonia.com/enviro/grants_app.shtml

EPA Grant-Writing Tutorial: This is an excellent source of information on how to develop a successful grant application! It provides lots of tips on how to develop the application and provides examples of good, complete grant applications. It is FREE for downloading at: http://www.epa.gov/grtlakes/seahome/grants.html
Source: USFWS, Southeast Region
17) RESOURCE: USGS Announces Online Access to Nationwide Fish Community Data

Data on fish communities are now available for 960 stream sites in more than 50 major river basins across the Nation. More than 1,900 fish community samples, collected from 1993 through 2002 by the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program, can be downloaded from
http://water.usgs.gov/nawqa/data. USGS fish community samples document the presence of all fish species and their relative abundances within designated stream reaches.

These fish data are part of the NAWQA Data Warehouse, which also provides online access to 8 million records of water-quality information, enabling water-resource managers, scientists, and the public to find data about the quality of water or chemical concentrations in aquatic tissue at 4,100 stream sites and 6,500 wells across the United States.

For more information on fish sampling protocols, please refer to, "Revised protocols for sampling algal, invertebrate, and fish communities as part of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program" at http://water.usgs.gov/nawqa/protocols/OFR02-150/index.html

Online access to macroinvertebrate and algae data are anticipated this spring and summer, respectively.

For questions regarding online data retrievals, please contact [email protected] or Mr. Sandy Williamson, 253-428-3600, ext. 2683. For technical questions, such as regarding biological collection methods and taxonomy, please contact Dr. Steve Moulton, [email protected], 703-648-6874. Additional information about NAWQA ecological studies also is available at http://water.usgs.gov/nawqa/ecology.

Source: Email forwarded by Axel Ringe.

18) RESOURCE: Impacts of Impervious Cover on Aquatic Systems
New Research from the Center for Watershed Protection: Impacts of Impervious Cover on Aquatic Systems Available electronically from http://www.cwp.org. Price: $25
The Center's newest report is a comprehensive examination of more than 225 multi-disciplinary research studies documenting the impact of urbanization and the associated impervious cover on aquatic systems. Impacts is the Center's most extensive exploration of imperviousness to date, and reviews the available scientific data on the myriad ways urbanization influences hydrologic, physical, water quality, and biological indicators of aquatic health. The research distilled in this report was conducted in many different eco-regions, climatic zones, and stream types. Weighing in at approximately 150 pages, Impacts includes more than 100 graphics and tables and is a must-read for watershed leaders, policy-makers and agency staff in watersheds across the country.
Source: Center for Watershed Protection listserve
19) PUBLIC NOTICE: NPDES Permits
TDEC has posted the following draft environmental permits to solicit comments and information necessary to evaluate the potential impact of the proposed activities on human health and the environment. Submit comments by mail to TDEC, Division of Water Pollution Control, 6th Floor, L&C Tower, 401 Church St., Nashville, TN 37243, Attn: Public Notice Coordinator; by fax at (615) 532-0503; or by email at [email protected] Comments must be received by APRIL 14, 2003.
Individual NPDES Permits
Proposed Reissuances
Applicant name Etowah STP
Permit number TN0063771 Permit Writer MTS EAC Chattanooga
Major discharger Yes
Location 275 County Road 850
County McMinn
City Etowah
Zip 37331
Description of activity Treatment of municipal sewage
Effluent description treated municipal wastewater from Outfall 001
Receiving stream Conasauga Creek at mile 8.0
Facility latitude 35.280278 Facility longitude -84.558333
NPDES Permit for Discharges from Municipal Separate Storm Sewer
System
Proposed Reissuances
Applicant name Nashville/Davidson County Municipal Separate Storm Sewer
Permit number TNS068047 Permit Writer RLH EAC Nashville
Major discharger Yes
Location 1607 County Hospital Road
County Davidson
City Nashville
Zip 37218
Description of activity
Effluent description municipal separate storm sewer system
Receiving stream Cumberland River
Facility latitude 35.200000 Facility longitude -86.800000
Applicant name City of Chattanooga Municipal Separate Storm Sewer System
Permit number TNS068063 Permit Writer WDM EAC Chattanooga
Major discharger Yes
Location 1001 Lindsey Ave
County Hamilton
City Chattanooga
Zip 37402
Description of activity Management of the separate storm sewer system
Effluent description municipal separate storm sewer system
Receiving stream Tennessee River
Facility latitude 35.066667 Facility longitude -85.266667
Applicant name City of Memphis Municipal Separate Storm Sewer System
Permit number TNS068276 Permit Writer MTS EAC Memphis
Major discharger Yes
Location 125 North Main Street
County Shelby
City Memphis
Zip 38103
Description of activity municipal separate storm sewer system
Effluent description municipal storm water
Receiving stream Various named and unnamed tributaries to the Mississippi River and to the
Mississippi River
Facility latitude 35.148333 Facility longitude -90.051111

Source: http://www.state.tn.us/environment/wpc/wpcppo/mdi/

20) PUBLIC NOTICE: TDEC Mining Section NPDES Permits
TDEC Mining Section has posted the following proposals to issue, reissue, deny or terminate National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits as listed below. These permits authorize and regulate discharges of treated wastewater and/or storm water from mining and processing facilities, including access roads and haul roads located within the affected areas. Send comments to TDEC Mining Section, Attn: Public Notice Coordinator, 2700 Middlebrook Pike, Suite 220, Knoxville, TN 37921 by APRIL 25, 2003

Non-Coal Proposed Reissuances
ASARCO, Inc., Tennessee Mines Division, 2421 Old Andrew Johnson Highway, Strawberry Plains, TN 37871-3507. Coy Mine, NPDES Permit TN0001732. This existing underground zinc mine, located at latitude 36_07_23_, longitude 83_28_43_, discharges treated wastewater and storm water into Mossy Creek in Jefferson County.
Ford Construction Company, P. O. Box 527, Dyersburg, TN 38025. Camden-Memphis Stone Pit, NPDES Permit TN0066133. This existing chert gravel mine and processing facility, located at latitude 36_02_30_, longitude 88_04_15_, discharges treated wastewater and storm water into Cypress Creek in Benton County. There are no changes in wastewater treatment, monitoring points, or acreage. The operator has requested permit renewal based on current "Approved" plans.

Franklin Industrial Minerals, 612 Tenth Avenue North, Nashville, TN 37203. Crab Orchard Plant, NPDES Permit TN0063631. This existing limestone materials processing plant, located at latitude 35_54'22., longitude 84_52'99., discharges treated wastewater and storm water into unnamed tributaries (karst drainways) in Cumberland County. Minor changes include the enlargement of Pond 001 and the associated acreage controlled by the structure. There are no changes in total permit acreage or the number of monitoring points. The operator has requested permit renewal based on current "Approved" plans.

Rinker Materials South Central, Inc., P. O. Box 2389, Knoxville, TN 37901-2389. Midway Quarry, NPDES Permit TN0031089. This existing limestone quarry and processing facility, located at latitude 36_03_49.4_, longitude 83_43_17.5_, discharges treated wastewater and storm water to karst topography within the vicinity of the Holston River in Knox County.

Sevier County Highway Department, 125 Court Avenue, Room 304, Sevierville, TN 37862. Sevier County Quarry, NPDES Permit TN0066214. This existing limestone quarry and rock crushing facility, located at latitude 35_52_30_, longitude 83_28_52_, discharges treated wastewater and storm water into karst topography and sinkholes in Sevier County. There are no changes in wastewater treatment, monitoring points, or acreage. The county has requested permit renewal based on current "Approved" plans.

Coal Proposed Terminations
Kopper-Glo Fuel, Inc., P. O. Box 203, Clairfield, TN 37715. Deep Mine 2, NPDES Permit TN0049972, SMCRA Permit 2925. This NPDES permit, authorizing the discharge of treated wastewater and storm water into Straight Creek at latitude 36_31'19., longitude 85_53'10., in Claiborne County, is proposed for termination. This facility is completely overlapped by Mountainside Coal Company, NPDES Permit TN0072575 and SMCRA Permit 3059, who conducts wastewater treatment and monitoring responsibilities. Kopper-Glo Fuel, Inc., is no longer responsible for this operation.

Premium Coal Company, Inc., P. O. Box 480, Lake City, TN 37769. Areas 8 and 9, NPDES Permit TN0051675, SMCRA Permits 82-052 and 2181257. This NPDES permit, authorizing the discharge of treated wastewater and storm water into Lower Fork at latitude 36°12'45., longitude 84°22'48., in Anderson County, is proposed for termination. These reclaimed surface mines have Phase III bond release from the Federal Office of Surface Mining (OSM). The sites also meet the Division's requirements for NPDES permit termination.

Tennessee Mining, Inc., P. O. Box 465, Jacksboro, TN 37757. Claiborne Mine 1, NPDES Permit TN0066052. This NPDES permit, authorizing the discharge of treated wastewater and storm water into Spruce Lick Branch at latitude 36_31_51_, longitude 83°50_45_, in Claiborne County, is proposed for termination. This reclaimed coal surface mine has received Phase III bond release from the Federal Office of Surface Mining (OSM). The site also meets the Division's requirements for NPDES permit termination.

Source: http://www.state.tn.us/environment/wpc/wpcppo/mining/index.shtml

21) PUBLIC NOTICE: Aquatic Resource Alteration Permit (ARAP) Notices
Mountainside Coal Company - OSM permit number 3127. This public notice covers two Aquatic Resource Alteration Permits for the proposed Cooper Ridge #3 surface mine. Written comments will be received through April 1, 2003.
Appolo Fuels Inc., Jellico Strip Mine - OSM permit number 3112. This public notice covers two Aquatic Resource Alteration Permits for the Jellico Strip Mine. Written comments will be received through April 18, 2003.
Robert Clear Coal Corporation - OSM permit number 3116. This public notice covers Aquatic Resource Alteration Permits for the proposed Robert Clear Mine AREA #9 surface mine. Written comments will be received through April 17, 2003.
To view copies of these public notices, visit http://www.state.tn.us/environment/wpc/wpcppo/mining/index.shtml

The following is a list of Public Notices from TDEC of permitting decisions, public hearings, and rulemaking activities. Public comment and participation are encouraged on all of these issues. Comments must be received within 30 days of the date that the notice is posted. Comments on any issue are welcome at any time and may be made by sending e-mail to [email protected]
March 21, 2003
NRS02.136 Mr. Charles Crews, proposed earthen dam and 70 acre impoundment, Inman Branch, near Fairview in Williamson County
NRS03.009 Town of Jonesborough, multiple crossings for gravity sewer line, Little Limestone Creek and unnamed tributary to Little Limestone Creek, Washington County
NRS03.053 Middle Tennessee Natural Gas Utility District, multiple crossings with natural gas pipeline, East Fork Stones River and tributaries and several other named and unnamed tributaries and wetlands along the pipeline alignment. The project is located in Cannon, DeKalb, and Warren Counties.
Source: http://www.state.tn.us/environment/wpc/wpcppo/arap/index.html
22) PUBLIC NOTICE: US Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District Permit Notices
The following is a list of Public Notices issued by the US Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District for work in waters of the United States. The notices listed are for applications currently under review. All work is proposed unless otherwise noted. If you wish to obtain a copy of a particular notice, you can contact our office at (615) 369-7500 or by mail and we will be happy to forward it to you. Be sure to include the Public Notice Number with your request.
U.S. Army Engineer District, Nashville
Corps of Engineers
Attention: Regulatory Branch
3701 Bell Road
Nashville, Tennessee 37214
Notice No.
03-24 - Expires 4/21/2003, City of Huntsville, Proposed Discharge of Fill Material Associated with Pipe Culvert Placement, Unnamed Tributary to Aldridge Creek Mile 4.2L, Opposite Tennessee River Mile 333.5R, Madison County, AL
03-23 - Expires 4/19/2003, City of Harriman, Proposed Channel Fill and Adjacent Wetland Fill, Unnamed Tributaries to King Creek Opposite Clinch River Mile 2.7R, Roane County, TN
03-02 - Expires 4/18/2003, Alabama Department of Transportation, Proposed Wetland Fill and Proposed Advanced Compensatory Wetland Mitigation, Wetlands Adjacent to McDonald Creek Mile 1.2 Opposite Tennessee River Mile 321.0R, Mitigation Site Located Adjacent to Tennessee River Mile 327.4R, Madison County, AL
03-20 - Expires 4/10/2003, Kentucky Transportation Cabinet, Proposed Discharge of Fill Material to Facilitate the Proposed Modifications to a Segment of US Highway 119, Unnamed Tributaries to the Poor Fork Cumberland River Between Miles 40.5 and 42.0L, Letcher County, KY
03-10 - Expires 4/5/2003, Tennessee Department of Transportation, Proposed Improvements to SR-91 Along New and Existing Alignment, Mountain City, Johnson County, TN
03-21 - Expires 3/30/2003, Ed Loy, Jr., Proposed Channel Dredging and Riprap, Holder Branch Mile 1.0R Opposite Tennessee River Mile 616.0R, Fort Loudoun Lake, Knox County, TN
03-19 - Expires 3/31/2003, Tennessee Streams Mitigation Bank, within the State of Tennessee
03-17 - Expires 3/24/2003, Proposed Channel Dredging and Bank Stabilization, Tennessee River Mile 638.5L, Fort Loudon Lake, Knox County, TN
03-16 - Expires 3/24/2003, Proposed Public Boat Launching Ramp, Fishing Pier, and Courtesy Dock, Sulphur Branch of the Big Sandy River Mile 3.7L, Kentucky Lake, Henry County, TN
03-15 - Expires 3/24/2003, Proposed Marina Renovations, Recessed Excavation In Back of Embayment, and Deposit of Fill Material Associated with Riprap Breakwater and Bank Stabilization, Cove off Bear Creek Mile 1.4L, Opposite Tennessee River Mile 32.0L, Kentucky Lake, Marshall County, KY
Source: http://www.orn.usace.army.mil/cof/notices.htm